Sculpture and installation

 

De zucht (The sigh), 2015

De zucht (The sigh), 2015
bandoneon, instruction label, wood, lacker
42 x 27 x 25 cm

Note / De zucht is a performative work in which air is involved. You hear one tone when you stretch the bandoneon and then, when you release it, with the help of the air valve, it’s as though you hear a sigh.
MvW: ‘At the time I didn’t know that the word bandoneon came from Heinrich Band, the inventor of the instrument and ‘Fueye’ is tango-speak for bandoneon, meaning “bellows”or “lung”. It was only after I had named the work, that I discovered that the so-called “suspiros” of this instrument literally means the sighing of the bandoneon.’

Sculpture and installation

 

New balls, please!, 2014

New balls, please!, 2014
multi channel sound installation with wood, glass, metal, speakers, sound equipment
sound recording 96Khz-24bit, 8’30”
approx. 280 x 1900 x 135 cm

Note / New balls, please! is a sound piece to which a sculpture has been added. The sound of bouncing tennis balls can be heard emanating from the work, with its zigzag-frontage and vibrating windowpanes. The installation is a response to the exceptionally tall windows in the Seitenlichtsaal at the Kunsthalle Düsseldorf.

Sculpture and installation

 

The weight of colour, 2006

The weight of colour, 2006
polyester, iridescent paint, wood and other materials
2x approx. 130 x 440 x 90 cm

Note / The weight of colour is one of a small group of works – mostly sculptures – that Van Warmerdam calls her analysis works. These are pieces that explain the structure of a concept or the creation of the image of a work in elemental terms. Here, the colourful is balanced against the colourless and she adds simply: ‘Colour wins’.

Sculpture and installation

 

Coming together, 2004

Coming together, 2004
wood, starfish, marble
20 x 17 x 16 cm

Note / When Kasper König and Barbara Weiss were officially married, Van Warmerdam made a curved wooden wall sculpture for them on which she placed a five-pointed starfish and a marble. MvW: ‘I imagined the marble rolling down towards the two lower points of the starfish.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Safe and sour, 2004

Safe and sour, 2004
wood, lacquer, nest, fibre, cotton
20 x 120 x 77,5 cm

Note / Safe and sour also came about as a result of Con vista al celestiale in Syracuse. As a memento mori, this sculpture refers to Vanitas paintings and above all to the devout life of Santa Lucia. Van Warmerdam associates the cotton wool-lined bird’s nest with the idea that a soft bed awaits Lucia in heaven. On responding to the legend of the martyr Santa Lucia, she says, ‘In my work I quite often react to places or the people in charge of the venue. Marlene often does the same on a historical level. So it was natural for us to dedicate our joint exhibition to the history of Syracuse, i.e. the local and the universal were brought together.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Tip of the iceberg, 2000

Tip of the iceberg, 2000
wood, lacker, plastic, ice
pedestal: 23 x 92 cm
iceberg: approx. 100 x 50 x 25 cm

Note / Tip of the iceberg is a reaction to the film Weather forecast. MvW: ‘When Weather forecast was completely finished as a film loop I thought, damn, the lump of ice is also a sculpture!’

Sculpture and installation

 

It's a sunny day, 1999

It’s a sunny day, 1999
water, water pumps, plastic bags, rubber, steel, wood
400 x 300 cm

Note / During one of her visits to Warsaw Van Warmerdam bought some flimsy coloured bags. For the exhibition ‘à vent’ in the FRAC Languedoc-Roussillon she thought it would be a good idea to make a swimming pool, bearing in mind the hot sunny days in the South of France. Paddles are used to keep the water in the pool churning constantly, thus making the plastic bags glide majestically across the water surface.

Sculpture and installation

 

Eiskugel (Ice ball), 1998

Eiskugel (Ice ball), 1998
wood, lacker, ice
75 x 8 x 100 cm, ice ball Ø 25

Note / In ‘Lila la la’ at DAAD, the two-hour performance was the heart of the exhibition. MvW: ‘I wanted the performance to have no leftovers, such as those that can normally still be seen weeks after the opening. That’s why the entire exhibition only lasted two hours. Melting ice fits well in such a short exhibition.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Sculpture and installation

 

Untitled (the little boy), 1991

Untitled (the little boy), 1991
wood, paint, metal
161 x 43 x 20 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam saw a knife thrower in the Jemaa el Fna Square in Marrakesh. The little boy, who watched the knives flying towards him while standing confidently against a wall, made such an impression on her that it resulted in a sculpture.

Sculpture and installation

 

Sculpture and installation

 

Sculpture and installation

 

Harde wind (Strong wind), 1991

Harde wind (Strong wind), 1991
wood, polystyrene, fabric, paint
122 x 97,5 x 37/56 cm

Note / When she made this work, Van Warmerdam asked herself ‘How can the feeling of having a bloated belly be made into a solid sculpture that remains light-hearted.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Open, dicht (Open, closed), 1991

Open, dicht (Open, closed), 1991
wood, paint
220 x 120 x 120 cm (2 parts)

Note / Van Warmerdam came into contact with all sorts of fabrics as a child because her father traded in textiles. Lace provided the inspiration for this featherweight sculpture. She says of this work: ‘I took great delight in making the drawing on the wooden board and sawing out the hundreds of hard pieces to eventually achieve the effect of lace.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Tumble, 1990

Tumble, 1990
wood, glass, metal
90 x 180 x 9 cm

Note / A double folded wire mesh bed and a series of tumblers in a row are sandwiched between two wooden boards. The artist intended to evoke a sort of dizziness with the undulating motion of the wire mesh on the one hand and whisky glasses on the other.

Sculpture and installation

 

Mickey Mouse, 1990

Mickey Mouse, 1990
wood, polystyrene, lacker, fabric
68 x 51 x 9 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam made a highly abbreviated Mickey Mouse using the circles of three white bowls; one side of the sculpture has big ears and the other small.

Sculpture and installation

 

Maar ondertussen (But meanwhile), 1989

Maar ondertussen (But meanwhile), 1989
fabric, wood, metal
approx. 100 x 144 x 77 cm

Film and video

 

Het Grote Geheugen (The Big Memory), 2008

Het Grote Geheugen (The Big Memory), 2008
35 mm film loop, aspect ratio 4:3, colour, 0’22”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9

Note / For the International Sculpture Exhibition Sonsbeek ’08, Van Warmerdam made a film of an eye that has developed over thousands of years, from the woolly mammoth to the contemporary elephant. By filming an omniscient eye, she creates an ode to seeing. MvW: ‘I heard recently that scientific study has shown that three quarters of the brain is reserved for seeing. I don’t know what the further implications of that are, but I do know that I also experience it as such.’

Het Grote Geheugen – sculptuur (The Big Memory – sculpture), 2008
sculpture for digital film loop
concrete, iron, wood, polyester, 52 inch LCD screen
270 x 160 x 420 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam wished to extend the cautious blinking of an elephant’s eye, which must have already witnessed so much throughout evolution, towards the present day by placing the film in a sculpture with an elongated roof.

Het Grote Geheugen – doek (The Big Memory – cloth), 2008
painted elephant cloth : digital print, paint on fabric
151 x 332 cm

Note / This elephant in the procession on the opening day of the Sonsbeek exhibition helped draw the public’s attention to the film sculpture Het grote geheugen in Sonsbeek Park. The cloth on the animal’s back shows a film still, which, in the context of the procession through the city of Arnhem, was intended mainly as a promotional element.

 

Film and video

 

Another planet, 1998

Another planet, 1998
VHS, video loop, colour, 48″
DVD-player, monitor, wooden shelf, steel
monitor: 52 cm diagonal / shelf: 44 x 58 x 58 cm
edition: 3 for each language: Dutch, English, French, German, Norwegian, Swedish
added: DVD

Note / MvW: ‘The end of a film is never the end, because it remains in your head, you think about it, you remember fragments of it. An end is never-ending…’

Film and video

 

Voetbal (Football), 1995

Voetbal (Football), 1995
VHS, colour, sound, 9’02”
monitor: 52 cm diagonal, wooden pallet: 8 x 100 x 55 cm
edition 10 + 2 AP + 1 HC
added: DVD

Note / The artist got to know a number of people from a sports club for the film loop Sprong. There she heard of a boy at a Rotterdam football club who could balance a ball on his head for ten minutes. She sought him out and asked him to demonstrate that in front of her camera in a schoolyard.

Film and video

 

Fiets (Bicycle), 1994

Fiets (Bicycle), 1994
VHS, colour, sound, 2’12”
monitor, 8 bricks, wooden shelf
monitor: 52 cm diagonal / bricks and shelf: 15 x 62 x 45 cm
edition 10 + 2 AP
added: DVD

Note / Van Warmerdam videoed a rehearsal of the performance Bicycle the day before the opening of the ‘Caravanserail’ exhibition. The ringing of the church bells was not in the script, but Van Warmerdam was delighted to record it in the video.