Other works

 

Sepp in de wolken (Sepp in the clouds), 2008

Sepp in de wolken (Sepp in the clouds), 2008
watercolour on paper
24 x 32 cm

Sepp in de wolken (Sepp in the clouds), 2008
study – watercolour on paper, cardboard
24 x 32 cm

Other works

 

Stand-in, 2007


Stand-in, 2007

colour photograph, perspex, aluminium
120 x 178 cm
edition 5 + 1 AP

Stand-in, 2007
study – colour photograph, perspex, aluminium
20,6 x 31 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam’s separation came like a bolt from the blue, and the work Forever from 2000 suddenly acquired an opposite meaning: ‘Not forever’. Here, the artist stands holding the work on the same spot where the photo was originally taken, undecided whether to push the work into the trees or throw it into the ditch.

Other works

 

Dream machine's dog, 2007

Dream machine’s dog, 2007
acrylic paint, inkjet print on canvas
200 x 258 cm
unique series of 3

Dream machine’s dog, 2007
study – acrylic paint, pencil, inkjet print on canvas
2 parts, 41 x 58 cm each

Note / In late 2006 Van Warmerdam had stills of her film Dream machine printed onto canvas after seeing wispy animals and people appear in the glass every time it was screened. She saw a dog, seahorses, a bison, a bird, an elephant, a dragon and an aeroplane. She worked out how the outline of the dog could best be applied to the film still and employed this technique in all her Dream machine canvases.

Other works

 

Speed, 2005

Speed, 2005
photographs on dibond, gimbal, wire, fan
180 x 123 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Speed, 2005
study – colour photograph, perspex, aluminium
2 parts, 41,2 x 31 cm each

Note / One of the two sides of Speed shows a garage door without a spiral of light, which disappears in the slow rotation of the hanging photo, making way for the side with the light drawing.

Other works

 

Underwater I and II, 2005

Underwater I and II, 2005
photographs on dibond, gimbals, wire
2 parts, 180 x 123 each
edition 3 + 1 AP

Underwater I and II, 2005
study – colour photograph, perspex, aluminium
4 parts, 31 x 41,2 cm each

Note / This work consists of two panels with photographs on both sides, which slowly rotate on their own axis in the air currents produced by electric fans. Both panels show the countryside around the artist’s studio in Abcoude. Nothing ever happens there. On each of the photo panels the landscape with a ditch in the foreground is interrupted by two splashes of water.

Other works

 

Throw, 2005

Throw, 2005
photograph on dibond, wooden stick
123 x 180 cm
edition 2 + 1 AP

Throw, 2005
study – colour photograph, perspex, aluminium
20,6 x 31 cm

Note / For her solo exhibition in the CCA in Kitakyushu, Van Warmerdam responded to Zen Buddhism by photographically freezing a stick in its flight over a Dutch rooftop.

Other works

 

My God, 2004

My God, 2004
colour inkjet, gold leaf, varnish, paper, dibond
109 x 167 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

My God, 2004
study – colour inkjet, gold leaf, varnish, paper, dibond
20,6 x 31,5 cm

Note / Carravaggio’s famous painting Sepulture of Santa Lucia, which hangs in the Regional Museum of Palazzo Bellomo in Syracuse, prompted Dumas and Van Warmerdam to make works on the legend of the martyr Santa Lucia. My God is one of the works Van Warmerdam made for their duo exhibition Con vista al celestiale in Syracuse. She thought that Lucia’s calling to God and God’s calling to Lucia could best be expressed with the aid of a Jacob’s ladder. MvW: ‘A Jacob’s ladder descends from heaven and God calls: “Luciaaaaa!” I placed her name in gold letters upside-down on the photo, in other words as seen through the eyes of God.’ The idea came to Van Warmerdam while she was studying seventeenth-century paintings.

Other works

 

Going out tonight, 2004

Going out tonight, 2004
colour inkjet, paper, glass, frame
61,5 x 92
edition 3

Going out tonight, 2004
study – colour inkjet, paper, dibond
20,6 x 28,6 cm

Note / MvW: ‘When evening falls, the snowballs seem relatively luminous in the dimming half-light, comparable to lights in nightlife.’

Other works

 

Tomorrow, 2004

Tomorrow, 2004
colour inkjet, paper, dibond
110 x 172 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Tomorrow, 2004
study – colour inkjet, paper, dibond
20,6 x 31,5 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam wanted to make a photograph of a blue sky with an optimistic and abstract atmosphere. She had herself photographed in such a way that only a small part of her face – virtually unrecognizable – is in the picture.

Other works

 

Hopla (Whoops), 2003

Hopla (Whoops), 2003
paint, glass plate
157 x 120 x 0,4 cm

Hopla (Whoops), 2003
study – paint, glass plate
50 x 30 cm

Note / A misted-up window is an open invitation for a finger drawing and Van Warmerdam has captured that here on a sandblasted pane of glass, which should preferably be placed in front of a window.

Other works

 

Mad cows!, 2002

Mad cows!, 2002
inkjet on paper, museum glass, frame
approx. 62 x 92 cm (48 x 70 cm)
edition 5

Mad cows!, 2002
study – colour photograph on dibond, perspex
20,6 x 31 cm

Note / MvW: ‘Someone once said to me, “Look, a cow with a ‘laken’ (sheet); that’s a Lakenvelder.” I’d never seen these animals in that light before, and they do indeed look as though they’re wearing a sheet. This was in the time of mad cow disease and I thought: this cow is black and white, and black and white can be reversed.

Other works

 

Other works

 

Other works

 

Other works

 

In thought, 2002

In thought, 2002
colour photograph on dibond, perspex
120 x 178 cm
edition 6

In thought, 2002
study – colour photograph on dibond, perspex
20,6 x 31 cm

Note / MvW: ‘I was walking outside my studio with a glass bubble in my hands. The farmhouses and cows reflected in it like a film. In the end I was unable to do anything with this and threw the mirrored bubble in the ditch out of desperation, where the thing remained floating. I liked how it looked in the middle of the duckweed and took a photo of it. Later I thought of also throwing a few smaller bubbles in the ditch and gave the photo the title In thought.’ Because of the way in which In thought came about, the artist says that the photograph is, in fact, a representation of the moment of disoriented ‘thought’ before an actual idea forms.

Other works

 

Walk-through landscape, 2000

Walk-through landscape, 2000
photographs, perspex, aluminium
100 x 337 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Walk-through landscape, 2000
study – photographs, perspex, aluminium
20 x 70 cm

Note / This wall sculpture requires a certain amount of action from the viewer to see the work in its entirety. The ‘snowy’ and ‘snowless’ mountains can only be seen when you walk along in front of the dual landscape photograph. MvW: ‘I wanted to think about something that remains, changes and that also returns. And I really wanted to make a sculpture.’ This is the final work in the ‘snowy’ and ‘snowless’ series in the Swiss mountains.

Other works

 

Forever, 2000

Forever, 2000
colour photograph, perspex, aluminium
120 x 178 cm
edition 6 + 1 AP

Forever, 2000
colour photograph on dibond
100 x 147 cm
edition II AP

Forever, 2000
study – colour photograph, perspex, aluminium
20,6 x 31 cm

Note / For years Van Warmerdam had a large number of paper handkerchiefs printed with ‘Yes’, with which she intended to make something one day. When she was thinking about a photograph of a lace wedding dress, she constructed a sculpture with ‘Yes’, which took the place of her then husband. Her own face is obscured by the leaves. She added the bird’s house in the top right corner as an iconographic element, and the tree with its foliage as a repoussoir offers a vista of an unpredictable yet sunny perspective. (See illustration p. 179.)

Other works

 

Catch, 1999

Catch, 1999
colour photograph, perspex, aluminium
120 x 163 cm
edition 5 + AP

Catch, 1999
study – colour photograph, perspex, aluminium
20,6 x 31 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam returned from a visit to a photo bank in Amsterdam with a photograph of a misty wooded landscape. To this she added a ball, to accompany the moon that shines dimly through the trees, and two child’s hands in the foreground, ready to catch the ball – or the moon.

Other works

 

There you are, 1999

There you are, 1999
colour photograph, perspex, aluminium
180 x 270 cm
edition 5 + 1 AP

There you are, 1999
study – colour photograph, perspex, aluminium
21 x 31 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam drove past Lake Neuchâtel in search of a suitable mountainside at which Michel Ritter could shout the names of the Swiss artists for the film loop Echo. From the car she saw a group of swans bobbing in the middle of the expanse of water and cried out to her travelling companion ‘Wow, couldn’t I make a work out of that?’

 

Other works

 

Open tap, 1998

Open tap, 1998
cybachrome on dibond
10 x 15 cm/12 x 18 cm/20 x 30 cm/26 x 40 cm/40 x 60 cm/
50 x 75 cm/60 x 90 cm/100 x 150 cm/10 x 15 cm
series of 8 unique pieces + 1 AP

Open tap, 1998
study – black and white photo, glass, frame
24,9 x 29 cm (10 x 15 cm)

Note / MvW: ‘Someone once told me that an eddy in the northern hemisphere spins in the opposite direction to one in the southern hemisphere. At home I saw the clockwise eddy in my washbasin in a different light. It was then that I made Open tap.’

 

Other works

 

Don't walk, walk, 1997

Don’t walk, walk, 1997
colour photo, perspex, aluminium
180 x 270 cm
edition 5 + 1 AP

Don’t walk, walk, 1997
study – colour photo, perspex, aluminium
21 x 29 cm

Note / MvW: ‘I stood waiting at a pedestrian crossing on 5th Avenue and saw that both signs were lit simultaneously. That resulted in comical confusion. I immediately wanted to make a film of this. The New York Police Department provided me with traffic lights that could be switched on and off manually. The film I made with this was rather dull so it eventually became a photograph.’

 

Other works

 

Bibberend glas melk (Vibrating glass of milk), 1991

Bibberend glas melk (Vibrating glass of milk), 1991
black and white photo, aluminum, plexiglass
100,5 x 102 cm
edition 3

Bibberend glas melk (Vibrating glass of milk), 1991
study – black and white photo, aluminum, plexiglass
14 x 14 cm

Note / The artist had seen vibrations on the surface of a glass of milk she was drinking in the train. Later she recreated these vibrations in a glass of milk and called it simply ‘Vibrating glass of milk’.