Film and video

 

Het Grote Geheugen (The Big Memory), 2008

Het Grote Geheugen (The Big Memory), 2008
35 mm film loop, aspect ratio 4:3, colour, 0’22”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9

Note / For the International Sculpture Exhibition Sonsbeek ’08, Van Warmerdam made a film of an eye that has developed over thousands of years, from the woolly mammoth to the contemporary elephant. By filming an omniscient eye, she creates an ode to seeing. MvW: ‘I heard recently that scientific study has shown that three quarters of the brain is reserved for seeing. I don’t know what the further implications of that are, but I do know that I also experience it as such.’

Het Grote Geheugen – sculptuur (The Big Memory – sculpture), 2008
sculpture for digital film loop
concrete, iron, wood, polyester, 52 inch LCD screen
270 x 160 x 420 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam wished to extend the cautious blinking of an elephant’s eye, which must have already witnessed so much throughout evolution, towards the present day by placing the film in a sculpture with an elongated roof.

Het Grote Geheugen – doek (The Big Memory – cloth), 2008
painted elephant cloth : digital print, paint on fabric
151 x 332 cm

Note / This elephant in the procession on the opening day of the Sonsbeek exhibition helped draw the public’s attention to the film sculpture Het grote geheugen in Sonsbeek Park. The cloth on the animal’s back shows a film still, which, in the context of the procession through the city of Arnhem, was intended mainly as a promotional element.

 

Film and video

 

Douche (Shower), 1995

Douche (Shower), 1995
35 mm film loop, colour, 4’11”
approx. 300 x 400 cm

Note / In addition to Handstand and Sprong, Van Warmerdam also wanted to make a new film for her contribution to the Venice Biennale. ‘During the humid days of the Venice Biennale, what could be better than cooling off under a shower?’ she wondered. In a radio interview Rudi Fuchs once asked her why she chose to film a man under the shower, to which she replied: ‘This is someone who is very good at showering.’
Shortly after the Biennale she was invited to make a work for NS Schiphol. This was Douche as a permanent installation: ‘A refreshing image for travellers who are sorely in need of it’, the artist comments. The film was reshot and the cinema projector placed in a container that was so dust-free that, to everyone’s surprise, the film could be screened for eight to ten months without changing the copy.