Sculpture and installation

 

In the air, 2009

In the air, 2009
PVC, polyester, paint
2 parts, approx.168 x 97 cm / 120 x 125 cm

Note / MvW: ‘I see this as a definition of movement reduced to the bare bones. And that twice.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Hier gibt es höhere Wesen (Here are higher beings), 2005

Hier gibt es höhere Wesen (Here are higher beings), 2005
pyrite in matrix and stone, metal, paint
21,5 x 21 x 21,5 cm
edition 2

Note / While searching for a suitable butterfly for You and I (2004), Van Warmerdam stumbled upon pyrite, a mineral that crystallizes in the form of cubes. She left the perfect geometric form untouched in the rock and made a wall-mount, the triangular shape of which refers to the painting Höhere Wesen befahlen rechte obere Ecke schwarz malen! by Sigmar Polke. Here, she goes a step further by playing virtually no mediating role and showing what was created by a higher being.

Sculpture and installation

 

Untitled (the little boy), 1991

Untitled (the little boy), 1991
wood, paint, metal
161 x 43 x 20 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam saw a knife thrower in the Jemaa el Fna Square in Marrakesh. The little boy, who watched the knives flying towards him while standing confidently against a wall, made such an impression on her that it resulted in a sculpture.

Sculpture and installation

 

Sculpture and installation

 

Sculpture and installation

 

Harde wind (Strong wind), 1991

Harde wind (Strong wind), 1991
wood, polystyrene, fabric, paint
122 x 97,5 x 37/56 cm

Note / When she made this work, Van Warmerdam asked herself ‘How can the feeling of having a bloated belly be made into a solid sculpture that remains light-hearted.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Open, dicht (Open, closed), 1991

Open, dicht (Open, closed), 1991
wood, paint
220 x 120 x 120 cm (2 parts)

Note / Van Warmerdam came into contact with all sorts of fabrics as a child because her father traded in textiles. Lace provided the inspiration for this featherweight sculpture. She says of this work: ‘I took great delight in making the drawing on the wooden board and sawing out the hundreds of hard pieces to eventually achieve the effect of lace.’

Other works

 

Hopla (Whoops), 2003

Hopla (Whoops), 2003
paint, glass plate
157 x 120 x 0,4 cm

Hopla (Whoops), 2003
study – paint, glass plate
50 x 30 cm

Note / A misted-up window is an open invitation for a finger drawing and Van Warmerdam has captured that here on a sandblasted pane of glass, which should preferably be placed in front of a window.

Hidden works

 

Hidden works

 

Aanloopplankje (Run-up board), 2008

Aanloopplankje (Run-up board), 2008
oil paint on canvas panel
13 x 18 cm

Note / A small white monochrome canvas stands on a wooden shelf between two windows in the artist’s studio. MvW: ‘This is a white image that acts as a motivator for me. Even though it’s painted and seems finished, for me it’s not quite complete and I keep it that way intentionally. It is one of the first things I made when I moved into my new studio. The canvas provides a new thinking space. Sometimes, when I’m alert and really see the work, I have the feeling that I’m working in two spaces instead of just one. I project new works onto the run-up board and as they get closer to becoming an attractive image, I use it as a springboard to my studio where I take the first steps towards realizing a plan. I like to give the small canvas on the wooden shelf a push in this direction.’

Hidden works

 

Lucky you!, 1998

Lucky you!, 1998
offset on carton, varnish, paint
10 x 15 cm
edition 500
publisher: Malmö Konsthall

Note / Van Warmerdam was asked permission for a postcard of her work to be made for the museum shop of the Malmö Konsthall. She gave it, but she also wanted to make a new work in the form of a card. That became Lucky you!, a scratch card under which she drew a yellow sun, referring indirectly to both Bera Nordal’s new position and the appointment of Sune Nordgren in Baltic, Gateshead.