Film and video

 

La visione, 2018

La visione, 2018
Digital film loop: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9, colour, 1’36”
approx. 300 x 530 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Note / La visione is one of the many film loops Van Warmerdam made recently while during a longer stay in Rome. One might describe the motif in this work as “appearing” and “disappearing”. The camera plays with the aura of bright sunlight behind the statue of an angel. About her work, the artist says: ‘It’s important to me that the work moves in some way or another, either literally or figuratively. I’m looking for clarity, too – for a simple image that intensifies for example through repetition.’

Film and video

 

Overlap, 2017

Overlap, 2017
Digital film loop: H264, aspect ratio 16:9, colour, 0’49”
approx.150 x 265 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Note / MvW: ‘In high school I struggled with mathematics. I simply did not get it at all and I failed my final exam. Despite this misery, and it was misery, I can be grateful to mathematics since there is one concept from that class that I still remember: the subset. Imagine two circles crossing with a shared space in the middle that can be small or quite large. This area of overlap is what you call the subset. Recently, to my delight I saw this concept in action on the street. It was right outside my house. I ran out with my camera and the wind did the rest.’

Film and video

 

Fast Forward, 2016

Fast Forward, 2016
Digital film loop: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9, colour, 3’04”
approx. 250 x 445 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Note / MvW: ‘In the fall of 1995, I took the course History of documentary at the New School in New York. I could hardly believe what I saw during the first lectures: Lumière, Flaherty, Vertov and so on. It was somehow so close to what I’d made in the preceding years and yet I’d never even heard of them until that moment. Quite a shock! Particularly due to one scene in Robert Flaherty’s Nanook of the North.
A canoeist and a mother with children emerge from a canoe -followed by even more children and finally a dog too. They all appear like wonderful rabbits of various sizes out of a magician’s hat!
Nanook of the North made a deep impression on me at the time, and also when I recently watched this scene again. It even led me to make a new film, Fast Forward in which the journey itself is more important than the final destination.’

Film and video

 

Prague 24/7, 2015

Prague 24/7, 2015
Digital film loop: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9, colour, sound, 1’32”
approx. 122 x 217 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Note / In tourist shops, nothing is as fleeting as the trinkets that are supplemented once again every season with a new eye-catcher. Such as the thermal mug that reacts to differences in temperature; when filled, the heat of the coffee or tea makes an image appear. MvW: ‘After pouring in the hot tea, a panoramic cityscape gradually crawled up from the bottom to the top. I’d never previously seen a vertical film pass before my eyes.’

Film and video

 

Film and video

 

Monologue intérieur, 2013

Monologue intérieur, 2013
Digital film loop: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9, colour, 19’34”
approx. 200 x 355 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Film and video

 

Kersentijd (Cherry season), 2012

Kersentijd (Cherry season), 2012
35 mm film loop, colour, 2’25”
projector, loop system
approx. 200 x 355 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9

Note / In Kersentijd (Cherry Season), a young woman playfully hangs a cherry-bob on her ear. From the intimate intrusiveness, a sensual painterly space emerges: on the shiny surface of the cherries is the reflection of an open window with curtains moving in the wind. Through her mirroring of the immense in the minute, Van Warmerdam manages to inject a magical quality to something as ordinary as a pair of cherries. The two-and-a-half minute sequence is one camera movement looped and will be experienced as a continuous flow. As the film is ‘one big close-up’, the screen is relatively monumental in relation to the space, encouraging the viewer to be immersed in the work.

Film and video

 

Rrrolle - red, 2011

Rrrolle – red, 2011
35 mm film loop, colour, 0’32”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 4:3

Note / MvW: ‘A blue-winged macaw is just as beautiful as a red-winged macaw and that’s why I had both birds turn a somersault on their perch.’

Note / Van Warmerdam is sensitive to the directness of onomatopoeic appeals in titles. The titles Rrrolle – blue and Rrrolle – red are examples of this onomatopoeia.

Film and video

 

Rrrolle - blue, 2011

Rrrolle – blue, 2011
35 mm film loop, colour, 0’53”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 4:3

Note / MvW: ‘A blue-winged macaw is just as beautiful as a red-winged macaw and that’s why I had both birds turn a somersault on their perch.’

Note / Van Warmerdam is sensitive to the directness of onomatopoeic appeals in titles. The titles Rrrolle – blue and Rrrolle – red are examples of this onomatopoeia.

Film and video

 

Face to face, 2011

Face to face, 2011
35 mm film loop, colour, 2’14”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 530 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9

Note / In Face to face a group of macaws circle round a tree, which appears to exert a strong force of attraction on the birds. The tree trunk has an anthropoid face. Could that be the reason for all the excitement? One might believe it is, particularly when one of the macaws goes and sits on the ‘chin’ of the tree and looks straight into the tree trunk’s eyes. But is it true? MvW: ‘People have a primitive urge to see faces and objects in things and in the film the birds also seem to have that tendency. To me, Face to face is an encounter not just between the birds and the tree, but also between the viewer of the film and the tree.’

Film and video

 

Light, 2010

Light, 2010
35 mm film loop, aspect ratio 4:3, colour, 1’30”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9
N.B. Light is part of Life, a concert in collaboration with composer Louis Andriessen with four films.

Note / The artist’s hand slides across the slats of closed Venetian blinds, allowing light into the room. The end of the film shows an uncontrollable burst of light entering the space. Van Warmerdam reacts to the work In the distance, and in Light she gives ‘looking into the distance’ a more abstract form. MvW: ‘To me, the light that blinds you at the end of the film is an anticipation of what eventually awaits us all.’

Film and video

 

In the distance, 2010

In the distance, 2010
35 mm film loop, aspect ratio 4:3, colour, 2’00”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9
N.B. In the distance is part of Life, a concert in collaboration with composer Louis Andriessen with four films.

Note / Drops of condensation roll down a windowpane before the artist’s hand wipes them away, clearing the view and revealing the relaxed elderly couple in the distance. MvW: ‘With their blurred and un-blurred existence far away, I wanted to emphasize the notion of temporality and the end of time.’

Film and video

 

Couple in the distance, 2010

Couple in the distance, 2010
2x 35 mm film loop, aspect ratio 4:3, colour, 5’23” and 2’00”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm each
edition 1 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9

Note / The film loops Couple and In the distance are combined in this work and are projected on each side of a freestanding wall as an autonomous film sculpture. Two film loops of the same couple are shown from two angles.

Film and video

 

Couple, 2010

Couple, 2010
35 mm film loop, aspect ratio 4:3, colour, 5’23”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9
N.B. Couple is part of Life, a concert in collaboration with composer Louis Andriessen with four films.

Note / Curator Martijn van Nieuwenhuyzen once photographed the former museum director Bram Hammacher and his wife while they rested on a bench in the Giardini di Venezia during a visit to the Biennale. In response to this, Van Warmerdam made the film loop Couple, in which the camera traces a circular motion above and beneath them, sometimes in a distinct close-up, sometimes viewed from a distance or from above.

Film and video

 

Wind, 2010

Wind, 2010
35 mm film loop, aspect ratio 4:3, colour, 5’03”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9
N.B. Wind is part of Life, a concert in collaboration with composer Louis Andriessen with four films

Note / This film was made in response to wagonloads of autumn leaves that Van Warmerdam saw being delivered to a coastal town somewhere in Belgium. Shortly afterwards she collected leaves on the Elswout country estate near Haarlem and laid them out to dry on the floor of her studio. She used them for the film loop Wind, which opens with leaves being lifted up and blown along, carried by gusts of wind in a deserted industrial environment. MvW: ‘A lone feather is whisked away on a sudden breeze, which to me makes this my most narrative film so far. Fortunately, just before the end of the film, the feather is completely reabsorbed into the mass of blowing leaves; not much happened.’

Film and video

 

Onderweg (On the way), 2009

Onderweg (On the way), 2009
35 mm film loop, aspect ratio 4:3, colour, 4’13”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9

Note / ‘An image is most attractive when it just looks normal, but conveys a sense that something’s not quite right,’ says Van Warmerdam

Onderweg – installatie (On the way – installation), 2009
installation with digital film loop, mobile French fries stand, light
52 inch LCD screen
cabin: 220 x 320 x 220 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam was invited by museum director Philip van den Bossche to make an outdoor piece for Beaufort 3, a triennial of contemporary art on the Belgian coast. She made the film Onderweg and installed it in a mobile snack bar. The self-explanatory nature of a Belgian fish and chips stand is counteracted on entering, when one unexpectedly sees a film of a boy on a bicycle, lost in thought.
MvW: ‘No chips with mayonnaise here, but a different kind of energy.’

Film and video

 

Het Grote Geheugen (The Big Memory), 2008

Het Grote Geheugen (The Big Memory), 2008
35 mm film loop, aspect ratio 4:3, colour, 0’22”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9

Note / For the International Sculpture Exhibition Sonsbeek ’08, Van Warmerdam made a film of an eye that has developed over thousands of years, from the woolly mammoth to the contemporary elephant. By filming an omniscient eye, she creates an ode to seeing. MvW: ‘I heard recently that scientific study has shown that three quarters of the brain is reserved for seeing. I don’t know what the further implications of that are, but I do know that I also experience it as such.’

Het Grote Geheugen – sculptuur (The Big Memory – sculpture), 2008
sculpture for digital film loop
concrete, iron, wood, polyester, 52 inch LCD screen
270 x 160 x 420 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam wished to extend the cautious blinking of an elephant’s eye, which must have already witnessed so much throughout evolution, towards the present day by placing the film in a sculpture with an elongated roof.

Het Grote Geheugen – doek (The Big Memory – cloth), 2008
painted elephant cloth : digital print, paint on fabric
151 x 332 cm

Note / This elephant in the procession on the opening day of the Sonsbeek exhibition helped draw the public’s attention to the film sculpture Het grote geheugen in Sonsbeek Park. The cloth on the animal’s back shows a film still, which, in the context of the procession through the city of Arnhem, was intended mainly as a promotional element.

 

Film and video

 

Trembling, 2008

Trembling, 2008
35 mm film loop, colour, 3’09”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Note / The calyxes of a petunia quiver more than usual in the shopping basket on the front of a bicycle. With the grey road surface rushing past, Van Warmerdam had the film loop Trembling served to her on a platter. To make it, she first had to ask René Welker to return the plant, which had been a gift. MvW: ‘A strange rhythm is created because the horn-shaped flowers are so top-heavy. It is difficult to fix your attention on single flowers. Every attempt to do so is immediately thwarted.’

Film and video

 

Film and video

 

Dream machine, 2006

Dream machine, 2006
35 mm film loop, colour, 2’39”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 5 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 4:3

Note / Marijke van Warmerdam says about this piece, ‘I hope the viewer soon becomes engrossed in what he or she is seeing. It’s not just the glass but also the background. This film loop is black and white at the start of the film, but changes into strong vibrant colours. Such a change can also occur in a dream, it’s an extra layer, an extra space.’

Film and video

 

Wake up!, 2006

Wake up!, 2006
35 mm film loop, colour, 2’44”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Note / In order to film an Arcadian landscape, Van Warmerdam decided to travel to Morocco with a small crew. The tranquil landscape is disturbed by a splash of water that suddenly appears in the picture.

Film and video

 

Roeren in de verte (Stirring in the distance), 2004

Roeren in de verte (Stirring in the distance), 2004
35 mm film loop, colour, 2’34”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 4:3

Note / In Roeren in de verte Van Warmerdam combines the ‘here’ and ‘there’ in various ways in one single image. This mental construct yields not only the interior and exterior, a tabletop and a horizon, but also stirring a cup of tea in the room and the snow outside. MvW: ‘The snow is emphasized by the fact that it’s gradually accelerated and slowed down as it falls; it’s self-evident, but not quite.’

Film and video

 

Film and video

 

The Fuck, 2004

The Fuck, 2004
16 mm film loop, colour, 1’58”
projector, loop system, projection table
approx. 210 x 280 cm
edition 3 +1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 4:3

Note / This film loop originated as a result of a fragment of the film loop Shake, which the artist found the most beautiful part of the film.

Film and video

 

Shake, 2001

Shake, 2001
35 mm film loop, colour, 2’15”
projector, loop system
approx. 210 x 280 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Note / For the Yokohama Biennale M. combined pink business cards and the blossom of the Japanese cherry in a film. She wanted to respond to something typically Japanese.