Sculpture and installation

 

Untitled (Room 1405), 1994

Untitled (Room 1405), 1994
installation in bed: plastic, pigments, fabric
approx. 40 x 210 x 130 cm

Note / In 1994, for the first time ever an art fair was held in a hotel. Each stallholder had the use of one room in which to stay the night and another in which to exhibit. Van Warmerdam was invited by Galerie van Gelder to show a work in room 1405 of the Hilton Hotel. She made a lifelike replica of the gallery owner, who lies asleep in his hotel room while visitors might also bump into him in person.

Sculpture and installation

 

Untitled, 1993

Untitled, 1993
computerised doll, fabric, plastic, adapter, charge cable
187 x Ø 95 cm

Note / In 1993 Curator Moritz Küng in collaboration with colleague friends Armand Mevis, Linda van Deursen and Van Warmerdam staged the exhibition ‘Uitnodiging!’ in AP, a project space of Galerie van Gelder. Van Warmerdam’s contribution was a computer-controlled doll, the idea being that it was the exhibition’s first visitor.

Sculpture and installation

 

Pashok (Fitting cubicle), 1992

Pashok (Fitting cubicle), 1992
fabric, pulley, winch, cord
200 x 80 x 80 cm

Note / In a fitting cubicle you change clothes and look at yourself, to then be looked at by others. Van Warmerdam seeks to emphasize the transformation that occurs in the cubicle by rigging it up with a block and tackle, so as to achieve lightning-fast disappearance and reappearance.

Sculpture and installation

 

Sculpture and installation

 

Pin's head, 1991

Pin’s head, 1991
fabric, head pins
60 x 50 x 20 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam once said how she thought that a picture she found of a cat’s head wearing glasses was wonderful. People who visited her were asked to stick a good few pins into a giant pin-cushion in order to create the picture of the cat. She explains: ‘Many hands make light work.’ Pin’s head is the first of her works that was sold in a gallery.

Sculpture and installation

 

Sculpture and installation

 

Harde wind (Strong wind), 1991

Harde wind (Strong wind), 1991
wood, polystyrene, fabric, paint
122 x 97,5 x 37/56 cm

Note / When she made this work, Van Warmerdam asked herself ‘How can the feeling of having a bloated belly be made into a solid sculpture that remains light-hearted.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Let's face it, 1991

Let’s face it, 1991
plastic, fabric, paper
11 x 8 x 8 cm

Note / In Let’s face it Van Warmerdam sought to reconcile the professions of graphic designer and sculptor in one small sculpture. The designer’s thought process has much in common with that of the sculptor, but also many differences. She gave this work as a present to her then partner and graphic designer with the words ‘Let’s face it.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Mickey Mouse, 1990

Mickey Mouse, 1990
wood, polystyrene, lacker, fabric
68 x 51 x 9 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam made a highly abbreviated Mickey Mouse using the circles of three white bowls; one side of the sculpture has big ears and the other small.

Sculpture and installation

 

Prima vera, 1989

Prima vera, 1989
Stainless steel, fabric
95 x 16 x 16 cm

Sculpture and installation

 

Maar ondertussen (But meanwhile), 1989

Maar ondertussen (But meanwhile), 1989
fabric, wood, metal
approx. 100 x 144 x 77 cm

Other works

 

Bouncing ball, 2011

Bouncing ball, 2011
inkjet on adhesive fabric
variable sizes
edition 2 + 1 AP

Note / MvW: ‘Allowing thoughts to flutter around or bounce is important to the way I work and is extremely close to the act of looking. This is something very different from analysis, which usually only occurs afterwards. It is good, though, to look back every now and then.’

Other works

 

Idealen (Ideals), 2002

Idealen (Ideals), 2002
digital print on vinyl fabric, metal rings
152,5 x 206 cm
edition 3

Idealen (Ideals), 2002
digital print on paper, frame
approx. 30 x 42 cm
edition 50

Note / Van Warmerdam expresses her way of looking and thinking in a great many sculptures. Occasionally she also does that in a photograph, as in Ideals. Here she shows the difference between dreaming and making that dream a reality. MvW: ‘It’s a photographic work in which I conceive a plan to “do” or make something, with the anticipation of how beautiful it might become.’

Hidden works

 

Stropdas (Tie), 1997

Stropdas (Tie), 1997
in collaboration with JCJ Vanderheyden
copy print on fabric
144,5 x 9 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam and JCJ Vanderheyden designed a tie on the occasion of their exhibition in Galerie van Gelder. On the left-hand side of the tie a bear stands on its hind legs, while on the right-hand half the bear appears to be scratching the head of JCJ Vanderheyden as he takes a photograph.