Film and video

 

Onderweg (On the way), 2009

Onderweg (On the way), 2009
35 mm film loop, aspect ratio 4:3, colour, 4’13”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9

Note / ‘An image is most attractive when it just looks normal, but conveys a sense that something’s not quite right,’ says Van Warmerdam

Onderweg – installatie (On the way – installation), 2009
installation with digital film loop, mobile French fries stand, light
52 inch LCD screen
cabin: 220 x 320 x 220 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam was invited by museum director Philip van den Bossche to make an outdoor piece for Beaufort 3, a triennial of contemporary art on the Belgian coast. She made the film Onderweg and installed it in a mobile snack bar. The self-explanatory nature of a Belgian fish and chips stand is counteracted on entering, when one unexpectedly sees a film of a boy on a bicycle, lost in thought.
MvW: ‘No chips with mayonnaise here, but a different kind of energy.’

Film and video

 

LichteStelle, 2000

Lichte Stelle, 2000
35 mm film loop, colour, 2’53”
projector, loop system
approx. 300 x 400 cm
installed with pavilion at Expo 2000, Hanover
installed with wooden bridge at S.M.A.K., Ghent

Lichte Stelle, 2000
16 mm film loop, colour, 2’53”
projector, loop system, projection table
approx. 210 x 280 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 4:3

Note / MvW: ‘While jogging at the Krumme Lanke in Berlin I saw a boy standing by the water. I wanted to record this tranquillity in a film. During the filming a duck unexpectedly traced a horizontal line straight across the picture. In the montage I saw this horizon correction by the duck as a gift and embraced it.’

 

Film and video

 

Le retour du chapeau (The return of the hat), 1998

Le retour du chapeau (The return of the hat), 1998
35 mm film loop, colour, 1’31”
projector, loop system, straw hats
approx. 300 x 400 cm

Le retour du chapeau (The return of the hat), 1998
16 mm film loop, colour, 1’31”
projector, loop system, projection table
approx. 210 x 280 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 4:3

Note / Le Creux du Van is in the Swiss Jura, where fickle whirlwinds blow. According to local legend, if you lose your hat on the edge of the ravine, the wind will ensure that it lands back on your head of its own accord. Van Warmerdam made a permanent installation in the Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital in Utrecht, which she supplied with straw hats for the children receiving treatment there. MvW: ‘They watch the film of a hat that disappears and then returns after a while… just like the child who goes into hospital and hopefully comes out again.’

Film and video

 

Frame, 1997

Frame, 1997
in collaboration with Bregtje van der Haak
16 mm film loop, black and white, sound, 5’17″
projector, loop system, projection table, mini-disk, speakers
approx. 285 x 380 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Note / Together with Bregtje van der Haak, in New York Van Warmerdam interviewed Americans who had something to say about what ‘looking’ meant to them. One interviewee was able to think more clearly when he stared out the window of the train; another was afraid of looking someone straight in the eye. A number of these people were later asked to look out of a window for the film Frame.

Film and video

 

Douche (Shower), 1995

Douche (Shower), 1995
35 mm film loop, colour, 4’11”
approx. 300 x 400 cm

Note / In addition to Handstand and Sprong, Van Warmerdam also wanted to make a new film for her contribution to the Venice Biennale. ‘During the humid days of the Venice Biennale, what could be better than cooling off under a shower?’ she wondered. In a radio interview Rudi Fuchs once asked her why she chose to film a man under the shower, to which she replied: ‘This is someone who is very good at showering.’
Shortly after the Biennale she was invited to make a work for NS Schiphol. This was Douche as a permanent installation: ‘A refreshing image for travellers who are sorely in need of it’, the artist comments. The film was reshot and the cinema projector placed in a container that was so dust-free that, to everyone’s surprise, the film could be screened for eight to ten months without changing the copy.