Sculpture and installation

 

Drop, 2012

Drop, 2012
multi channel sound installation for staircase
sound recording 96Khz-24bit, 2’38’’
variable dimensions
edition 2 + 1 AP

Note / MvW: ‘For Museo Serralves in Porto I made a new work Drop, in which a bouncing ping pong ball through sound boxes comes down a staircase. This sound installation connects two museum floors and invites a visitor to walk down the stairs to visit the second part of the exhibition.’

Sculpture and installation

 

e, 2012

e, 2012
offset on carton, plastic
approx. 8 x 16 x 23 cm

Note / MvW: ‘For Museo Serralves in Porto I made this mini basket with “and” cards in Portuguese. As well as being my next exhibition location after Rotterdam, this is also another work in itself and so it always remains a case of and, and, and…’

Other works

 

The ping pong man, 2012

The ping pong man, 2012
3 ping-pong balls, mirror, dibond
33 x 25 x 4 cm

Other works

 

Faust leest Fuchs (Faust reads Fuchs), 2012

Faust leest Fuchs (Faust reads Fuchs), 2012
watercolour on paper
32 x 24 cm

Other works

 

Hidden works

 

Meer Dumas (More Dumas), 2012
embroidered handkerchief
28 x 30 cm

Exhibition views

 

Tapis volants
Les Abattoirs, Toulouse, France, 2012
Group exhibition

Exhibition views

 

No goal
Le Case D’Arte, Milan, Italy, 2012
Solo exhibition

Exhibition views

 

Haru
Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo, Japan, 2012
Solo exhibition

Film and video

 

Kersentijd (Cherry season), 2012

Kersentijd (Cherry season), 2012
35 mm film loop, colour, 2’25”
projector, loop system
approx. 200 x 355 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 16:9

Note / In Kersentijd (Cherry Season), a young woman playfully hangs a cherry-bob on her ear. From the intimate intrusiveness, a sensual painterly space emerges: on the shiny surface of the cherries is the reflection of an open window with curtains moving in the wind. Through her mirroring of the immense in the minute, Van Warmerdam manages to inject a magical quality to something as ordinary as a pair of cherries. The two-and-a-half minute sequence is one camera movement looped and will be experienced as a continuous flow. As the film is ‘one big close-up’, the screen is relatively monumental in relation to the space, encouraging the viewer to be immersed in the work.