Sculpture and installation

 

Bera is the ball, 1998

Bera is the ball, 1998
bowling alley, pins, bowling balls, 2 trolleys
approx. 190 x 4200 x 146 cm

Note / During the preparations for the exhibition ‘Who’s got the ball’, Sune Nordgren was the departing director of the Malmö Konsthall and Bera Nordal was the incoming director. Van Warmerdam created a faintly sloping bowling lane, where the ball represented the new director Bera and the pins represented Sune.

 

Sculpture and installation

 

A thought, 1998

A thought, 1998
computer print on aluminium, 2 crumplings
135 x 250 cm, crumplings approx. Ø 80 cm
edition 10 (English and Polish version)

Note / ‘The first idea is always the best’, said Van Warmerdam to curator Adam Szymczyk in a discussion on her work for ‘Roundabout’ in the Centre for Contemporary Art in Warsaw. It turned out that a similar expression also exists in Polish: ‘The first thought into my diary, the second into the garbage.’ To Van Warmerdam this evoked the image of thoughts literally being discarded. At a local printer the text was printed in Polish and English using old-fashioned wooden block letters. A portion of the print run became part of A thought as crumpled balls of paper.

Sculpture and installation

 

Eiskugel (Ice ball), 1998

Eiskugel (Ice ball), 1998
wood, lacker, ice
75 x 8 x 100 cm, ice ball Ø 25

Note / In ‘Lila la la’ at DAAD, the two-hour performance was the heart of the exhibition. MvW: ‘I wanted the performance to have no leftovers, such as those that can normally still be seen weeks after the opening. That’s why the entire exhibition only lasted two hours. Melting ice fits well in such a short exhibition.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Preview, 1998

Preview, 1998
CD player, CD, speakers
edition 2

Note / While climbing the staircase in DAAD to the exhibition ‘Lila la la’, visitors could hear cheering football fans via loudspeakers, whose voices swelled and then lowered in disappointment, apparently because a goal had just been missed by a fraction. MvW: ‘An almost goal can be heard in this work.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Lila la la, 1998

Lila la la, 1998
10.000 printed ping pong balls, event

Note / Lila la la consists of ping-pong balls in four colours printed with ‘Lila’ and ‘la’. At the two-hour exhibition in DAAD the balls were thrown out a window on the top floor. They landed on a large terrace and some bounced into the exhibition space. Children collected the balls in straw hats and took them upstairs again and again, where they were thrown out the window once more. Van Warmerdam’s motives: ‘One ping-pong ball makes a beautiful sound, so how beautiful would ten thousand bouncing ping-pong balls sound?… and on top of that, it’s also a loop!’

Sculpture and installation

 

Solo, 1998

Solo, 1998
CD player, CD, speakers, marble
30 x 100 x 70 cm
edition 3

Note / MvW: ‘In 1996 I was in Quimper on a working trip in preparation for the group exhibition “Travelling Latéral”. In an empty space at the centre Le Quartier, I heard the sound of a trowel scraping on a marble floor. I rerecorded that for the work Solo.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Raket (Rocket), 1998

Raket (Rocket), 1998
metal, screen print, other materials
approx. 320 x 95 x 165 cm
edition 30 + 1 AP

Babyraket (Baby rocket), 1998
metal, screen print, other materials
approx. 136 x 39 x 89 cm

Note / In addition to Vrroem, Van Warmerdam wanted to make a work for the exhibition in Galerie Micheline Szwajcer in Antwerp as a reaction to the Belgian comic book culture. For this work she chose an image associated with the comic hero Tintin and made a rocket, which can actually be launched by standing on a pedal. On the advice of the firm of solicitors Boekel De Nerée concerning the copyright, she asked Erven Hergé’s permission to use the typical red and white rocket.

Sculpture and installation

 

Plenty, 1998

Plenty, 1998
offset on carton, plastic
approx. 24 x 60 x 39 cm

Note / Plenty stems from the video Another planet, in which the words ‘the end’ are repeated endlessly. The recurring text image ‘the end’ left Van Warmerdam with a strong feeling of ‘and’, ‘and’, ‘and’. In Plenty the word ‘and’ is printed in different languages on cards, which the artist placed in a plastic basket. The cards with the words ‘and, og, und, en, et’ were sent as invitations for her exhibition ‘Og, og’ in Galleri Riis in Oslo.

Hidden works

 

Hidden works

 

Bera, Sune, 1998

Bera, Sune, 1998
ceramics, text, 2 parts
edition 200, of which 100 numbered, artist’s initials in print on saucer
publisher: Malmö Konsthall

Note / MvW: ‘Bera Nordal of the Malmö Konsthall asked me to make a multiple and then I saw the café-au-lait cups in the restaurant of the Konsthall. I thought; if you write Sune on the saucer and Bera on the cup, then she covers him, while he occasionally pops up when you take a sip of your coffee.’

Hidden works

 

Lucky you!, 1998

Lucky you!, 1998
offset on carton, varnish, paint
10 x 15 cm
edition 500
publisher: Malmö Konsthall

Note / Van Warmerdam was asked permission for a postcard of her work to be made for the museum shop of the Malmö Konsthall. She gave it, but she also wanted to make a new work in the form of a card. That became Lucky you!, a scratch card under which she drew a yellow sun, referring indirectly to both Bera Nordal’s new position and the appointment of Sune Nordgren in Baltic, Gateshead.

Hidden works

 

Postzegel in Jungle World (Postage stamp in Jungle world), 1998

Postzegel in Jungle World (Postage stamp in Jungle world), 1998
in collaboration with Erik van Lieshout
offset, page in ‘Jungle World’, no. 40, 30 September 1998
edition 15
publisher: Jungle World, Berlin

Note / MvW: ‘Marius Babias asked if I wanted to make a page for the magazine Jungle World. I then asked Erik van Lieshout to announce my two-hour exhibition in DAAD. He made a drawing, in which I then made another tiny drawing – postage-stamp size – to announce his exhibition at Galerie Fons Welters in Amsterdam.’

Hidden works

 

Move, 1998

Move, 1998
offset in book ‘1. Berlin Biennale’
edition 10.000
publisher: Berlin Biennale für Zeitgenössische Kunst e.V., Berlin

Note / Van Warmerdam lived and worked in Berlin for two years, after which she returned to The Netherlands. She presented the move from Berlin to Amsterdam as a dry announcement – and also a work – in the catalogue of the first Berlin Biennale.

Hidden works

 

Untitled, 1998

Untitled, 1998
offset on paper
21 x 29,7 cm
edition 1.500
publisher: Museum Ludwig Köln

Note / Van Warmerdam made a response to her own work for a publication by the Museum Ludwig in Cologne. Next to a picture of Skytypers she drew a blue line, next to Heen en weer (Back and forth) she covered the page with red stripes and next to Pool she tallied four green stripes like a pool score.

Hidden works

 

Bonanza, 1998

Bonanza, 1998
screen print on T-shirt
sizes M and L
edition 20

Note / The theme of the Sydney Biennale was ‘Every day’. Van Warmerdam capitalized on that and placed three of her one-armed bandits against one wall, and the posters Good days, bad days on the other. MvW: ‘You couldn’t win any money, so I came up with a T-shirt printed with gold coins as a trophy for every player that won the jackpot’.

Exhibition views

 

Every day
11th Biennale of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, 1998
Group exhibition

Exhibition views

 

Who’s got the ball
Malmö Konsthall, Malmö, Sweden, 1998
Solo exhibition

Exhibition views

 

Lila la la, 1998

Lila la la
Daadgalerie, Berlin, Germany, 1998
Solo exhibition

Exhibition views

 

Og, og
Galleri Riis, Oslo, Norway, 1998
Solo exhibition

Film and video

 

Le retour du chapeau (The return of the hat), 1998

Le retour du chapeau (The return of the hat), 1998
35 mm film loop, colour, 1’31”
projector, loop system, straw hats
approx. 300 x 400 cm

Le retour du chapeau (The return of the hat), 1998
16 mm film loop, colour, 1’31”
projector, loop system, projection table
approx. 210 x 280 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 4:3

Note / Le Creux du Van is in the Swiss Jura, where fickle whirlwinds blow. According to local legend, if you lose your hat on the edge of the ravine, the wind will ensure that it lands back on your head of its own accord. Van Warmerdam made a permanent installation in the Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital in Utrecht, which she supplied with straw hats for the children receiving treatment there. MvW: ‘They watch the film of a hat that disappears and then returns after a while… just like the child who goes into hospital and hopefully comes out again.’

Film and video

 

Car, 1998

Car, 1998
16 mm film loop, colour, 0’45”
projector, loop system, table, projection screen
table: 85 x 100 x 300 cm / screen: 75 x 100 cm
edition 3

Note / MvW: ‘I wanted to make an all-in-one film: a moving subject, stark and shiny, while virtually nothing happens in it. Then I saw a man in Washington polishing a car incredibly well.’

Film and video

 

Another planet, 1998

Another planet, 1998
VHS, video loop, colour, 48″
DVD-player, monitor, wooden shelf, steel
monitor: 52 cm diagonal / shelf: 44 x 58 x 58 cm
edition: 3 for each language: Dutch, English, French, German, Norwegian, Swedish
added: DVD

Note / MvW: ‘The end of a film is never the end, because it remains in your head, you think about it, you remember fragments of it. An end is never-ending…’