Sculpture and installation

 

Brown bag, 1995

Brown bag, 1995
brown bag, sound, walkman with speakers, sound tape
41 x 21 x 13,5 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam was walking home through a park in New York with her shopping in a paper bag. A vagrant was sitting on a bench humming a continuous and melancholic tune. She decided to return to the park with a dictaphone to record his humming. Later she made a loop from the recording, placed the dictaphone in a New York brown paper bag and named the sculpture Brown bag.

Sculpture and installation

 

Poef (Pouf), 1995

Poef (Pouf), 1995
pouf, motor, adapter
26 x Ø 48 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam thought that a seat from which to quietly observe the works in an exhibition was a nice idea, but where would that seat have to be placed? In answer to that question she made a pouf that automatically shifts position from time to time.

Sculpture and installation

 

Weegschaal (Scales), 1995

Weegschaal (Scales), 1995
scales, set of 4 pieces
dimensions variable
unlimited edition

Note / Van Warmerdam made an installation with dozens of bathroom scales for Moritz Küng’s space APP.BXL in Brussels. All the furniture in the apartment was placed on scales and throughout the month-long exhibition both the occupants and visitors sat unsteadily on the chairs and table.

Sculpture and installation

 

Klok (Bell), 1995

Klok (Bell), 1995
bronze, ceiling clamp
different sizes
12 unique pieces, produced in different pitches

Note / For many galleries, one has to ring the doorbell first before being granted entry. This was also the case at the first gallery in which Van Warmerdam exhibited in 1995. In her view, every visitor’s arrival at her exhibition should be announced loudly and clearly by having a large bronze bell chime in the gallery space when the doorbell is pushed.

Sculpture and installation

 

Carillon, 1995

Carillon, 1995
in collaboration with composer Jeff Hamburg
installation with carillon, relay, timer
45 x 115 x 50 cm

Note / A school bell in the form of a carillon with two melodies struck Van Warmerdam as a good alternative to the piercing sound of the bell that normally rings out across the schoolyard. She invited composer Jeff Hamburg to make one melody for the start of lessons and another for when school ends.

Sculpture and installation

 

Sculpture and installation

 

Vuilnisbakken (Dustbins), 1995

Vuilnisbakken (Dustbins), 1995
installation with zinc dustbins, gold leaf, varnish, concrete
14 pieces, 65 x Ø 35 cm each

Other works

 

Hidden works

 

Impressions, 1995

Impressions, 1995
offset in bulletin stichting FBKVB, no. 5, November 1995, pp.13-15
edition 6.000
publisher: Stichting FBKVB, Amsterdam

Hidden works

 

Klaar is Kees (Bob’s your uncle), 1995

Klaar is Kees (Bob’s your uncle), 1995
sticker in artist’s magazine ‘AP’, no. 1/1995
Ø 5 cm
edition 120
publisher: Galerie van Gelder, Amsterdam

Note / In The Netherlands the first name Kees immediately conjures up the expression ‘Klaar is Kees’ (Bob’s your uncle), which is a succinct way of saying that the work is finished. For the first issue of Kees van Gelder’s magazine AP, Van Warmerdam made a sticker with the text ‘Klaar is Kees’, with the instructions to stick it on the last page of the magazine. The fact that there was never a second edition of the magazine gave the sticker a prophetic significance.

Hidden works

 

Stropdas (Tie), 1995

Stropdas (Tie), 1995
tie, microphone, tape recorder, sound tape
147,5 x 9,5 cm

Note / For over twenty years Kees van Gelder has invited artists to make a tie on the occasion of their solo exhibition. For her first exhibition Van Warmerdam came up with a white tie with a microphone and a dictaphone for the inside pocket of the gallery owner, who was able to use it to record the comments of visitors at the opening. After the opening, the gallery owner used this tie again in 1997 at the opening of Van Warmerdam’s exhibition in the Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven. Thus far the cassette recordings have never been made public

Hidden works

 

La fille aux crêpes (The girl with the pancakes), 1995

La fille aux crêpes (The girl with the pancakes), 1995
paper on aluminium
13,6 x 20,6 cm
edition 10 + 2 AP

Note / During the opening days of the Venice Biennale Van Warmerdam was named ‘the girl with the pancakes’ by Didier Vermeiren, because of her contribution in the catalogue. For her first Dutch solo exhibition in 1995 she used this nickname as the title of the exhibition alongside her own name. In the edition La fille aux crêpes she sought to create that ambiguity once again.

Exhibition views

 

La fille aux crêpes
Galerie van Gelder, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1995
Solo exhibition

Exhibition views

 

Venice Biennial XLVI
Venice Biennial XLVI, Dutch Pavillion, Venice, Italy, 1995
Trio exhibition with Marlene Dumas and Maria Roosen

Exhibition views

 

APP.BXL
APP.BXL, Brussels, Belgium, 1995
Duo exhibition with Arnoud Holleman

Hidden works

 

Pannenkoeken (Pancakes), 1995

Pannenkoeken (Pancakes), 1995
offset in catalogue Marlene Dumas, Maria Roosen, Marijke van Warmerdam.
La Biennale di Venezia, Dutch Pavilion, Venice
edition 5.000
publisher: Mondriaan Foundation Amsterdam

Note / The catalogue for the 1995 Venice Biennale contains an eight-page contribution from Van Warmerdam with black-and-white photographs of pancakes flying through the air. The works for the Biennale were selected around the theme ‘the intermediate body’ and the pancakes in the catalogue were conceived by Van Warmerdam as a counterpart.

Film and video

 

Rijst (Rice), 1995

Rijst (Rice), 1995
16 mm film loop, colour, 0’18″
projector, loop system, paper, aluminium, mirror, shelf
projection size 15,4 x 21 cm
edition 5 + 1 AP

Note / During a taxi trip in Indonesia, Van Warmerdam suddenly shouted: ‘Whoa, whoa, whoa… stop! I saw something!’ On the side of the road she saw a young woman separating the rice from the husks in a rhythmic tempo. She made Rice with a simple 16mm wind-up camera.

Film and video

 

Voetbal (Football), 1995

Voetbal (Football), 1995
VHS, colour, sound, 9’02”
monitor: 52 cm diagonal, wooden pallet: 8 x 100 x 55 cm
edition 10 + 2 AP + 1 HC
added: DVD

Note / The artist got to know a number of people from a sports club for the film loop Sprong. There she heard of a boy at a Rotterdam football club who could balance a ball on his head for ten minutes. She sought him out and asked him to demonstrate that in front of her camera in a schoolyard.

Film and video

 

Blondine (Blond), 1995

Blondine (Blond), 1995
16 mm film loop, colour, 3’25”
projector, loop system, projection table
approx. 210 x 280 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP
added: ProRes 422 HQ, aspect ratio 4:3

Note / For the Kwangju Biennale in Seoul, Van Warmerdam contemplated the South Koreans with their raven-black hair and she thought it would be nice to bring ‘a blonde’ to that country.

Film and video

 

Douche (Shower), 1995

Douche (Shower), 1995
35 mm film loop, colour, 4’11”
approx. 300 x 400 cm

Note / In addition to Handstand and Sprong, Van Warmerdam also wanted to make a new film for her contribution to the Venice Biennale. ‘During the humid days of the Venice Biennale, what could be better than cooling off under a shower?’ she wondered. In a radio interview Rudi Fuchs once asked her why she chose to film a man under the shower, to which she replied: ‘This is someone who is very good at showering.’
Shortly after the Biennale she was invited to make a work for NS Schiphol. This was Douche as a permanent installation: ‘A refreshing image for travellers who are sorely in need of it’, the artist comments. The film was reshot and the cinema projector placed in a container that was so dust-free that, to everyone’s surprise, the film could be screened for eight to ten months without changing the copy.

Film and video

 

Douche (Shower), 1995
16 mm film loop, colour, 5’51”
projector, loop system, projection table
approx. 210 x 280 cm
edition 3 + 1 AP

Note / In addition to Handstand and Sprong, Van Warmerdam also wanted to make a new film for her contribution to the Venice Biennale. ‘During the humid days of the Venice Biennale, what could be better than cooling off under a shower?’ she wondered. In a radio interview Rudi Fuchs once asked her why she chose to film a man under the shower, to which she replied: ‘This is someone who is very good at showering.’
Shortly after the Biennale she was invited to make a work for NS Schiphol. This was Douche as a permanent installation: ‘A refreshing image for travellers who are sorely in need of it’, the artist comments. The film was reshot and the cinema projector placed in a container that was so dust-free that, to everyone’s surprise, the film could be screened for eight to ten months without changing the copy.