Sculpture and installation

 

The sky is falling and I want my mommy, 1991

The sky is falling and I want my mommy, 1991
installation with slides, projector, plaster
variable dimensions

Note / This installation with light and plaster mice was still untitled when the exhibition opened. The artist decided to give it the title of a pop song she heard often at that time.

Sculpture and installation

 

Untitled (the little boy), 1991

Untitled (the little boy), 1991
wood, paint, metal
161 x 43 x 20 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam saw a knife thrower in the Jemaa el Fna Square in Marrakesh. The little boy, who watched the knives flying towards him while standing confidently against a wall, made such an impression on her that it resulted in a sculpture.

Sculpture and installation

 

Sculpture and installation

 

Pin's head, 1991

Pin’s head, 1991
fabric, head pins
60 x 50 x 20 cm

Note / Van Warmerdam once said how she thought that a picture she found of a cat’s head wearing glasses was wonderful. People who visited her were asked to stick a good few pins into a giant pin-cushion in order to create the picture of the cat. She explains: ‘Many hands make light work.’ Pin’s head is the first of her works that was sold in a gallery.

Sculpture and installation

 

Sculpture and installation

 

Harde wind (Strong wind), 1991

Harde wind (Strong wind), 1991
wood, polystyrene, fabric, paint
122 x 97,5 x 37/56 cm

Note / When she made this work, Van Warmerdam asked herself ‘How can the feeling of having a bloated belly be made into a solid sculpture that remains light-hearted.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Open, dicht (Open, closed), 1991

Open, dicht (Open, closed), 1991
wood, paint
220 x 120 x 120 cm (2 parts)

Note / Van Warmerdam came into contact with all sorts of fabrics as a child because her father traded in textiles. Lace provided the inspiration for this featherweight sculpture. She says of this work: ‘I took great delight in making the drawing on the wooden board and sawing out the hundreds of hard pieces to eventually achieve the effect of lace.’

Sculpture and installation

 

Let's face it, 1991

Let’s face it, 1991
plastic, fabric, paper
11 x 8 x 8 cm

Note / In Let’s face it Van Warmerdam sought to reconcile the professions of graphic designer and sculptor in one small sculpture. The designer’s thought process has much in common with that of the sculptor, but also many differences. She gave this work as a present to her then partner and graphic designer with the words ‘Let’s face it.’

Other works

 

Bibberend glas melk (Vibrating glass of milk), 1991

Bibberend glas melk (Vibrating glass of milk), 1991
black and white photo, aluminum, plexiglass
100,5 x 102 cm
edition 3

Bibberend glas melk (Vibrating glass of milk), 1991
study – black and white photo, aluminum, plexiglass
14 x 14 cm

Note / The artist had seen vibrations on the surface of a glass of milk she was drinking in the train. Later she recreated these vibrations in a glass of milk and called it simply ‘Vibrating glass of milk’.

 

Other works

 

Your eyes only, 1991

Your eyes only, 1991
offset on aluminium
10 x 18,5 cm

Note / MvW: ‘Quite often my wish is to make an image that both stands still and moves on, as if I come closer to my subject. In Your eyes only repetition was used in order to have multiplied sections within the images. I could not resist alluding to this duality.’ Van Warmerdam left the eyes of the spaghetti-eating woman out of the picture in order to draw maximum attention to the form of the décolleté as an eye.

Exhibition views

 

Neighbourhood
AIR, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1991
Group exhibition

Exhibition views

 

All Mere
Aleph, Almere, The Netherlands, 1991
Solo exhibition